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Worth the Cost: How Oral Surgery Helps Avoid Emergencies in the Long Run

Welcome to our first article discussing the benefits of oral surgery and how it can prevent serious dental issues further down the line. Fears and anxieties around surgical procedures may deter some people from making an appointment with their oral surgeon, which could save them so much hardship in the long run. We hope that by increasing the understanding of how oral surgery works to halt dental issues in their tracks, we can help empower people to take that all-important step of booking a procedure they need.

Oral surgery is essential for dealing with many dental concerns, from wisdom tooth removal to surgery to realign your jaw. Delaying these issues doesn’t just mean the problem will continue — it all but guarantees the problem will get worse. Let’s explore the benefits of booking an appointment to get your dental issues dealt with right away.

Reduced Pain

Anxiety ahead of any surgery is normal. Various studies worldwide show that surgery is closely linked to increased anxiety levels due to a fear of increased pain, concerns about recovery time, and even a fear that a procedure might not go as planned.

The main point to remember if your oral surgeon recommends that you undergo a surgical procedure is that they are trying to reduce your level of pain. For example, an impacted wisdom tooth can be incredibly painful. It can push on other teeth, make your jaw ache, and even leave you reliant on daily painkillers — which can be detrimental to your health in different ways. Wisdom tooth removal is an oral surgical procedure with a possible recovery time of 1-2 weeks, during which time you may experience swelling, mild bruising, and stiffness in the jaw. But once that stiffness and swelling go away, you will be pain-free. Beyond that, you avoid the risk of further complications that could lead to you needing even more involved procedures in the future.

Fewer Complications

When you book an appointment with your oral surgeon for an essential procedure, you’re saving yourself from the risk of a whole range of additional complications. Let’s go back to the example of wisdom tooth removal. Leaving your wisdom tooth trapped under the gum or partially erupted will cause you ongoing pain. But did you know you also put yourself at risk of infection? Because impacted teeth can damage the gums, surrounding teeth, and even your jaw, they can create small wounds that allow bacteria to take hold. Those bacteria can lead to painful infections or even a serious form of gum disease called pericoronitis.

Dealing with severe gum disease can be a much more complex and lengthy process than oral surgery. It often calls for repeated appointments for gum scaling and root planing, a procedure where tools are used to physically smooth away the surface of your teeth under the gums. You may also need one or more courses of antibiotics, and if you don’t remove the wisdom tooth causing the problem, there is no guarantee the issues won’t return.

Another possible result of impacted wisdom teeth is that you can develop a cyst or even a tumor in your jaw. If this happens, you can require far more extensive oral surgery, even to the point of having part of your jawbone removed.

It’s clear that the much more efficient and straightforward wisdom tooth removal procedure is safer and far more beneficial for your overall health.

A Financial Consideration

One of the other factors that can stop people from choosing oral surgery is the potential cost. For example, if you’re playing sports and take a blow to the mouth that cracks one of your teeth, it can be tempting to leave it if you’re worried about the financial implications. But that cracked tooth can become a highway for infection to enter your body. The exposed inner tooth pulp is vulnerable to bacteria, and if the crack worsens, the tooth could even break completely. This can lead to pain, facial swelling, and even dental abscesses. Whatever the cost of your initial procedure, you will undoubtedly spend more money on dealing with the secondary complications of what was initially a relatively simple procedure.

Always discuss any financial conwith your oral surgeon or their team. They’ll be able to let you know what the best way forward is and compare the cost of a single procedure now with the potential future expense should you elect not to undergo surgery.

It’s important to note that your oral surgeon will only ever recommend a surgical procedure when it’s absolutely necessary. They will talk you through the process and what to expect so you can be as calm and prepared as possible. If you’ve been suffering from tooth pain or inflamed or bleeding gums, or if you have a dental emergency such as a cracked or broken tooth, talk to an oral surgeon and find out their expert recommendation. Contact Oral Surgery DC for more information.

Want a Bright and Healthy Smile Follow These Top Tips

Want a Bright and Healthy Smile? Follow These Top Tips

A bright and healthy smile starts at home. Seeing your dentist every six months for a routine cleaning and checkup is a big step in the right direction when it comes to your oral hygiene, but the path to your best smile begins with a consistent, everyday dental care routine. Here are some tips to help you achieve your most beautiful smile. 

  1. Choose Good-for-Your-Smile Foods 

It’s no secret that what you eat impacts your physical health, and your smile is no exception. A balanced diet will ensure you get all the vitamins and minerals you need to grow and maintain healthy teeth, but what you eat impacts your smile in other ways too.

 

For instance, crunchy fruits and veggies cause you to produce more saliva, which naturally washes your mouth in between brushing and flossing. Meanwhile, foods that are high in sugar should only be enjoyed on occasion because sugar can feed the bad bacteria in your mouth and contribute to tooth decay. 

 

While we’re on the topic, it’s well known that red wine, coffee, and soda will stain your teeth. In fact, any highly-acidic food or drink is bad for your smile as it can wear down enamel and discolor it over time. Instead, drink lots of water to gently rinse your mouth throughout the day and promote saliva production.

  1. Kick-Start Your Oral Hygiene With the Right Toothpaste and Brush

There are countless toothpaste types on the market, but did you know that whitening toothpaste actually contains abrasives that can wear down enamel over time? Enamel is the protective outer layer on your teeth — and when it gets thin, the naturally yellow center of your tooth is able to show through.

 

If you want the healthiest smile possible, choose a toothpaste with fluoride, which will help strengthen enamel over time. Fluoride can also help reverse early-stage tooth decay, which means fewer fillings. To max out your oral hygiene, pair that toothpaste with a soft bristle toothbrush to avoid unnecessary abrasion, and make sure you brush at least twice a day.

  1. Keep Your Tongue Clean

You may have heard that your tongue is the primary source of bad breath-causing bacteria, and that’s not a myth. A host of bacteria live on your tongue, both good and bad, and it’s important that you scrub your tongue every time you brush. Forgetting to clean your tongue is like wiping clean dishes with a dirty towel!

 

Choose a toothbrush with a tongue scrubber on the reverse side, or pick up a tongue scraper that’s designed to make quick work of cleaning your tongue. You don’t necessarily need to use toothpaste on your tongue — you just need some gentle abrasion to clean off the bacteria. Once you’re done, continue your oral hygiene routine with a fluoride mouthwash to rinse your tongue and pearly whites. 

  1. Never Skip Flossing Again

After you brush, always use floss. Flossing helps remove excess plaque and clean in between your teeth where your brush can’t reach. If that plaque isn’t removed, it will build up over time and put you at an increased risk of gum disease and other problems.

 

The type of floss you use doesn’t matter, as long as you’re using it correctly. String floss is affordable and easy to take with you anywhere, but disposable pre-strung floss comes on a little handle for easy use. Avoid nicking your gums with the floss, and use a couple of new pieces as you move around your mouth. 

 

If you floss every day, you’ll notice the color of your gums improving and any tenderness you’ve been experiencing may start to disappear. However, when you first start flossing, you might experience some discomfort and bleeding. Your dentist can show you how to floss properly and assess your gum health to let you know whether any discomfort or bleeding might be an early warning sign of issues like gum disease.

  1. Ask an Oral Surgeon About Gum Disease

Periodontitis, often called gum disease, is an infection in the gums that will degrade your jawbone over time and lead to tooth loss. Fortunately, gum disease is preventable with proper oral hygiene, which is good news since it’s a risk factor for heart and lung diseases and puts a serious damper on your healthy smile.

 

Bleeding when you floss could be an early sign of gum disease, and it’s one of the most obvious. Oftentimes, other symptoms go unnoticed — things like puffy, discolored, or tender gums and bad breath. Gum disease is incredibly common, especially if you don’t brush and floss regularly. That’s why you should talk to your oral surgeon about the health of your gums and discuss what they can do if you have any stage of gum disease. 

 

Keep an eye out for our upcoming blog for more information on why gum disease is so dangerous and how your oral surgeon can help you prevent and recover from gum disease and the decay or tooth loss that can result from it. In the meantime, contact Oral Surgery DC for more information on getting and maintaining a healthy smile.

 

Image credits: Photo by Mart Production on Pexels.

Five Steps You Can Take to Prepare Successfully for Your Oral Surgery Procedure

Dental care is an important component of positive health.

Although the bulk of dental procedures are diagnostic and preventative, approximately 10% are restorative (≈ 7%) and surgical (≈ 3%), according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. A 2007 study reported that five million Americans get their wisdom teeth removed each year, not to mention procedures such as dental implants and bone grafting. Each procedure offers its own unique benefits — especially when you follow all preoperative and postoperative instructions.

If you require oral surgery, you can take steps to ensure the most optimal outcome. The key is to take proactive action so that your recovery is as straightforward as possible. Surgery preparation will reduce your risk of complications, increasing the rate of recovery. These five steps may help you as you approach your upcoming oral surgery.

 

Step One: Start with a Consult Appointment

A consult appointment is a chance to our surgeon who examine your mouth and x-rays and go over your medical history to reach a diagnosis and offer a proposed treatment plan with the dental codes. You will also be advised to other treatment approaches that would meet an accepted standard of care.

Depending on procedure, it is sometimes possible to combine the consult appointment with treatment at the same time, such as for a single tooth extraction, however for complicated cases it helps to have a time-out between consult and procedure to ensure everyone understands the case and is comfortable with the approach.

Tip 1: Discuss any aspects of the surgery that give you anxiety. This will allow you to talk through your concerns so that you are much more comfortable on the day of your surgery. It’s also important to discuss any medications you are taking. The more your dental surgeon knows, the better for avoiding complications, such as drug interactions.

Tip 2: Many people are anxious about the cost of surgery and have a difficult time figuring out how much they will owe. If you have dental insurance, the treatment plan will provide dental codes for your care. You can call your insurance plan and check on coverage for each code. Our office will usually request a pre-authorization from your insurance plan, which will detail what is covered and your estimated co-pay will be. There is no charge for this service.

 

Step Two: Organize Postoperative Needs

Before your surgery date, ask a friend or family member to accompany you. After your surgery is complete, you will need a drive home. Regardless of the complexity of your surgery, even local anesthesia can impair your reflexes. If you opt for a ride service, make sure you do not order a car until you are told it is safe for you to leave.

Meal prep is also important. Be sure to follow a diet that will support you through your recovery, stocking up on soft, nutrient-dense foods. For example, cool or room-temperature liquids and soft solids may be best for the first day or two. Smoothies, applesauce, and yogurt are all ideal. You may then transition to warmer foods, such as broths, soups, and mashed potatoes. Prep any meals the day before you go into surgery so that you do not need to cook.

Tip: If you are undergoing a more complex operation, it’s important to plan ahead. If you live alone, ask someone to stay with you or at least check in. If you have children, arrange for child care. When you are preparing your meal plan, consider the addition of a vitamin C supplement. A 2018 study, published in Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, reported that vitamin C supplementation helps improve postoperative healing following dental surgery.

 

Step Three: Know the “Rules” for a Successful Recovery

There will be preoperative guidelines associated with your oral surgery. It is very important that you follow them. Again, it’s important to prepare yourself for any alterations to your routine, particularly in terms of eating, drinking, and smoking habits. For example, most times you cannot eat or drink anything prior to your surgery (6-8 hours before). In other cases, when all you require is a local anesthetic, you may be able to have a light meal a couple of hours before you arrive. It is also very important that you do not smoke for at least 12 hours before surgery and a minimum of 24 hours after.

Tip: Work with your oral surgeon to create a post-op recovery plan that works for you. Besides a meal plan, discuss what you will need for icing, pain medication, oral hygiene, etc. What will help you heal and what might interfere with your recovery? Knowing the “do’s and don’ts” will allow you to make the right decisions within the first 24 hours, as well as within the days and weeks to come. For example, many people do not realize the potential dangers of using a straw to drink. The suction created in your mouth can loosen the clot that keeps your wound closed and delay healing.

 

Step Four: Dress Appropriately for Surgery

When you are heading into surgery, you will want to wear comfortable clothing — for obvious reasons. However, it’s also important that you wear a short-sleeved shirt to accommodate your IV drip. This will also be necessary for monitoring your vital signs and blood pressure. Do not wear any jewelry and, out of courtesy, avoid wearing any colognes or perfume.

Tip: Wear something to your surgery that is easy to remove when you get home. Have a change of loose-fitting clothing ready for when you arrive, opting for an outfit that is comfortable enough to sleep in.

 

Step Five: Sleep Well and Arrive Early

The night before, prepare for oral surgery just as you would any other surgery. That means getting a good night’s rest. This will help you feel your best and better prepare the morning of. It’s important to not feel rushed before your surgery. Unless your surgeon says otherwise, arrive at your appointment 15-20 minutes early. This will allow you to ask any last-minute questions or fill out any necessary paperwork.

Tip: If you’re anxious the day before your surgery, take steps to ensure the best sleep possible. Recommendations include not consuming caffeine or alcohol, avoiding blue light from electronics, taking a warm bath, journaling to express your thoughts, and creating an optimal sleep environment.

If you think you may need oral surgery or have questions about what a certain procedure entails, Oral Surgery DC is here for you. Contact us for more information.

 

Image credits: Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.

When and Why Your Dentist Will Refer You to an Oral Surgeon

When it comes to the health of your mouth, it’s important to know which type of professional is best suited to handle the particular issues you are facing. Dentists focus on preventative care and also do cosmetic and restorative work like fillings, bridges, and even teeth whitening. On the other hand, oral surgeons are highly-trained specialists who concentrate on surgeries of the face and jaw. The two work together, and dentists will often refer patients to an oral surgeon if there is a problem that needs more advanced care.

In this article, we’ll explore a few of the most common reasons your dentist may refer you to the specialized care of an oral surgeon.

 

1. Removal of impacted teeth

Removing impacted wisdom teeth is a common procedure in most oral surgeons’ offices, but impaction can occur in other areas of the mouth as well. Impaction happens when a tooth doesn’t fully erupt from the gums. The most common causes of impaction are crowding or lack of space.

The third molars, often referred to as wisdom teeth, are the last to erupt and the easiest to become impacted. This can lead to adjacent tooth decay and gum disease, which is why dentists will often refer patients to an oral surgeon to take care of the problem.

 

2. Facial pain and jaw issues

Facial pain, popping sounds, and headaches are common symptoms of temporomandibular (TMJ) disorders. This joint connects the jaw to the skull. Research shows that about 5%-12% of the population suffers from it. Other jaw and joint disorders, either caused by accidents or present at birth, are common sources of oral surgeries.

Depending on the severity of the problem, there are different options for surgery — some ranging from minimally invasive (arthrocentesis) to full-on open joint surgery.

Because this is a focused area of the face, it’s important to have an oral surgeon evaluate and perform any procedures necessary. They have the advanced training and surgical knowledge to help alleviate pain and resolve jaw issues.

 

3. Dental implants

Dental implants are a surgical procedure that replaces the root with metal rods. Artificial teeth can also be added to aid in function and add a natural appearance. Because this is a surgery, it’s important to work with an oral surgeon in order to achieve the proper placement of the implants. Oral surgeons have experience dealing with the ins and outs of implant work and are also well versed to deal with any complications or issues that may arise.

Dental implant surgeries have increased in recent years because they are a solid alternative to dentures. Ill-fitting dentures can cause pain and various other dental issues, making implants a more desirable choice for many.

 

4. Snoring and Breathing Issues

Snoring is an uncomfortable and troubling sleep disorder that disrupts sleepers, or their partners. Snoring occurs when tissues in the throat relaxes enough and partially blocks the airway causing a vibrating sound, which can be soft or loud. Contrasted with sleep apnea, which is characterized by pauses in breathing or shallow breaths during sleep and may or may not be accompanied by snoring sound. Both conditions are potentially dangerous.

While the first step to eliminate the problem often comes in the form of weight loss, patients may also need to use a CPAP machine at night to help them breathe more easily.

For many people, snoring and sleep apnea may sound the same, but the two are different and it is sometimes possible to eliminate the snoring, yet have the characteristic stopping-and-starting of breathing during sleep of the sleep apnea persist. For this reason, a sleep analysis is recommended first.

Oral Surgeons get involved in severe forms of snoring. Usually after sleep analysis, the oral surgeon assesses the patient’s breathing obstruction and then if needed, perform surgery. Traditional surgery involves removing excess tissue near the throat. However, advances in the field of oral surgery now allow for excess tissue reduction to be done in office with the use of a laser. With no cutting or recovery period involved, snoring sufferers now have a much easier path to good sleep and health.

 

5. Cosmetic or reconstructive surgeries

Oral surgeons also work on correcting jaw and facial issues due to accidents, deformities, or traumas from pathology removal. These surgeries can often involve the restructuring of bones, tissues, and nerves. Extensive training, clinical practice, and years of study are needed to perform these complex procedures.

Some examples of these surgeries include cancer treatment and the removal of tumors, cysts, and lesions, along with cleft lip and cleft palate surgery.

 

6. Bone grafts

In order to support dental implants, a healthy jaw bone is necessary. Because of this, many oral surgeons recommend bone grafting before a patient receives their implants. This ensures there will be enough healthy bone in the mouth to secure the implants. Many patients looking to get dental implants do not have strong enough gums, so bone grafts are needed.

Bone grafts require the transplant of tissue, either from the patient or a donor, to initiate growth where bone is absent or limited. The procedure is a common one in oral surgeons’ offices, and they are able to leverage proven techniques to help encourage bone growth.

In addition to the procedures performed above, oral surgeons are also knowledgeable about general anesthesia, as many extensive surgical procedures may be better performed while the patient is asleep. Prescribing medications is another big job of oral surgeons. Depending on the extent of the surgery, surgeons will determine the level of pain management needed to ease patient discomfort while keeping them safe.

While your dentist is generally looking out for the health of your mouth and trying to prevent tooth and gum disease, there are some situations where an oral surgeon is needed. If you’re looking to get more information about Oral Surgery DC and the types of procedures we perform or how we can assist you, contact us today.

 

Image credits: Photo on Freepik.

Making the Most of Your Smile: Healthy Habits that Protect Your Teeth

The benefits of good dental hygiene may start with a gorgeous smile, but they extend to promoting your confidence and your physical health on many levels. Good oral health helps make you feel great not only physically, but it also assists in making you feel good about yourself when you have a fresh smile. If your teeth aren’t taken care of properly, this can lead to a number of irritations and infections, some of which could cause serious medical issues if left untreated. However, practicing basic dental hygiene can increase your overall wellbeing and make your smile stand out.

Making the most of your smile with healthy habits to protect your teeth only takes a few minutes a day. Here’s how you can make your smile the healthiest –and most noticeable– in the room.

 

Start with the basics

To make the most of any smile, using basic dental practices like brushing your teeth daily can help prevent plaque build-up, which leads to cavities and potential gum disease. Depending on what toothpaste you use and what your dentist recommends, daily brushing can also help whiten your smile so that it looks nice and clean.

Using mouthwash to gargle with can also help reduce and kill harmful bacteria that may be lurking in hard to reach spots. This is great for preventing tooth decay and can get between your teeth and under your tongue.

 

Water pik vs. flossing

If you’ve heard the long-running debate on whether a water pik is better than flossing, we’ve got the answers for you. The truth is that both options are great and provide you with similar benefits.

Both flossing and a water pik help remove plaque. However, water piks are especially beneficial for people who wear braces, and for those who have non-removable bridgework, implants, or crownwork. Compared to flossing, a water pik enables people with braces or this type of dental work to still clean away bacteria and other particles since string flossing may be a little more difficult to maneuver.

The downside is that water piks are a little less accurate than regular flossing. With a water pik, you may not be able to get rid of all the plaque that’s settling on and around your teeth, and it can be a little messy when you’re first trying to figure out how to aim and what specific pressure level to use.

Flossing is a beneficial practice to build a habit out of because it allows you to work on each tooth in full, helping you thoroughly clean away bacteria and plaque before it turns into tartar.

Both options are great for removing plaque, and rather than choosing one over the other, utilizing both can ensure a clean and healthy smile.

 

Should I brush multiple times a day?

It’s true that brushing your teeth at least twice a day can prevent plaque build-up and the settling of bacteria. Plaque only needs 48 hours to fully harden, so brushing roughly an hour after eating a good meal is recommended as it doesn’t give bacteria the time to grow.

While brushing, ensure you’re using a toothbrush that’s less than 3-4 months old. Once a brush begins to have frayed bristles, it’s less accurate on keeping bacteria from growing and can be more harmful than good. Forgetting to replace your toothbrush regularly increases the likelihood you will be leaving plaque or bacteria behind.

 

Am I brushing too hard?

Finding the perfect balance in pressure when brushing can feel frustrating. You don’t want to lightly brush and miss out on removing dangerous bacteria, but you also don’t want to brush so hard that you damage your gums or cause bleeding. It’s recommended that you gently press your brush against the base of your teeth and the edges of your gums. As you brush, you can move side to side, up and down, and in circular motions to ensure you’re touching all areas. This isn’t only good for removing particles but it also helps encourage the blood circulation in your gums and around your teeth.

 

Foods to avoid

As much as we all have our guilty pleasures with food, some can be a nightmare for our teeth if consumed too frequently. From alcohol to candy, soda, and more, different foods and beverages contain acids that are harmful to our oral health. While indulging from time to time in your favorite treat is completely fine, you may want to avoid these foods if you’re trying to improve your dental health or have an oral infection you’re trying to treat.

Number one on the list to avoid? Acidic foods to avoid in large quantities, like:

  • Sour candies – Many sour candies are filled with acids and are chewy. When you eat them this leaves behind build-up on your teeth that can be more difficult to remove, often allowing sugar to erode your enamel and encourage tooth decay.
  • Bread – Believe it or not, when you’re chewing, your saliva breaks down the starches in bread and turns it into sugars that can increase plaque levels.
  • Oranges, grapefruits, and citrus-based products – These items are often rich in Vitamin C but their acid content erodes enamel, which makes your teeth more susceptible to decay.

There are various other foods, treats, and beverages you can limit your consumption of in order to improve the health of your smile.

Have questions or need a little extra help with your smile? We’re here to provide expert support and care? Contact us today for more advice on what you can do to make the most of your smile and improve your oral health.

 

Image Credits: Photo by Racool_studio on Freepik

6 Ways Oral Surgeons Can Help Improve Your Quality of Life

When most people think about visiting the oral surgeon, it’s usually prompted by a pressing dental issue that needs to be addressed, such as wisdom teeth removal, or having dental reconstruction after an accident.

Although those are important and valid reasons to visit the oral surgeon, the reality is, oral surgeons also can help you improve your quality of life in a wide variety of situations, and maybe even a few you might not be aware of.

Tooth loss, for example, can affect your quality of life for normal oral function such as eating and drinking, and even extend to speaking and self-esteem. Through various approaches, an oral surgeon can quickly and effectively address many issues you may be experiencing and get you back to your normal life.

If you’re having problems with your mouth but have been held back from seeking solutions because of cost or fear, take a moment to consider the benefits of oral surgery.

Here’s a look at common procedures performed by an Oral Surgeon and how they can improve your overall quality of life:

 

Dental Implants

If you are missing a tooth or several teeth, dental implants not only improve the aesthetics of the mouth, but also restore functionality – improving overall quality of life.

A study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine found that osteoporotic women with dental implants compared to those who have missing teeth and use removable dentures, experienced a significantly higher quality of life in every aspect including occupational, emotional, and sexual health.

With dental implants, a medical-grade titanium post is inserted into the jaw replacing the missing tooth root. Over 3-6 months, the titanium osseointegrates with the bone, providing a solid foundation on which to attach an abutment and then the fabricated tooth, or crown. Not only do the implants look like natural teeth, but also with proper care, they can last a lifetime.

 

Sleep Apnea

Many who struggle with sleep apnea spend their nights attached to a sleep mask or hose to help ease the symptoms. However, through the use of laser technology, it is possible to decrease the excess tissue at the back of the mouth, keeping the airway clear while sleeping. The best part is that with the use of laser, there is no cutting or recovery period involved; the procedure is touchless and done in office, with each session lasting about 20-30 minutes. Most patients see improvement after 3-5 sessions.

If you’re experience severe symptoms of sleep apnea, it may be time to seek the help of an oral surgeon. They can help get rid of unnecessary tissue from the back of your throat, which often exacerbates sleep apnea symptoms.

After the removal, most patients find they are able to breathe more easily, and, as a result, sleep better.

 

Bone and Gum Grafting

Bone and gum grafting is sometimes necessary for people who have ignored missing teeth for a period of years.

This is because a missing tooth root can lead to a loss or melting away of the adjacent bone and tissue. Similar to how beach grass is often planted to abate beach erosion, tooth roots serve to anchor bone in the jaw.

If you already have a missing tooth and would like to have a dental implant placed, an oral surgeon will first determine if adequate bone is available to anchor the implant. Modern 3D scanning allows for precision bone measurement and a determination can quickly be made if a bone graft is needed before placement of the dental implant.

 

Reconstructive Surgery

Those who have suffered traumatic facial injuries from an accident or who have experienced losing several teeth may find it hard to complete everyday tasks such as speaking, eating, and drinking.

Reconstructive surgery, however, can help you replace damaged teeth, correct issues with your jaw, and address gum damage.

The starting point is a CT scan which will provide a 3D representation of the mouth and surrounding structures. Depending on the complexity of the case, your oral surgeon may recommend the procedure be undertaken in a hospital setting which provides a full range of anesthesia and surgical support options that maybe needed.

 

Biopsies

Sometimes, a routine visit to the dentist may find an unusual lesion, growth, or discoloration in the oral cavity, in which case you may be referred for a biopsy. Lesions are not always bad, however, a diagnosis cannot be made by visual inspection and x-ray imaging alone, so you may be referred to an oral surgeon for a biopsy.

A biopsy involves removing a small sample of the tissue from your mouth and sending it to a lab for analysis. Depending on the location of the lesion in the mouth, numbing medication maybe used for comfort. If access to the biopsy area is needed underneath the gum, a surgical procedure may be required, and this is sometimes done under sedation (put-to-sleep) for the procedure.

The lab is usually able to analyze the sample and issue results in 7-14 days, which provides a diagnosis for the issue, and the surgeon will then discuss treatment options. Starting treatment early leads to better prognosis and outcomes.

 

Jaw Surgeries

Jaw surgery can be necessary in a variety of circumstances: for an improperly aligned jaw, to correct issues with swallowing, or to minimize excessive breakdown of your teeth, to name a few.

An oral surgeon can assess your jaw and any symptoms you may be experiencing to let you know if surgery will correct it. By addressing the problem head on, you can ensure a lifetime of a happy, healthy mouth with restored tooth and jaw function.

 

In need of help?

If you find yourself experiencing any of the issues discussed above, or others related to oral health that aren’t listed here, contact us today. We’d love to set up a consultation to offer our expert advice for improving your health and quality of life.

 

Image credit: Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels