Entries by Oral Surgery DC

What is the Trigeminal Nerve?

By: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons – AAOMS Located in the head and neck, the trigeminal nerve is one of a group of 12 cranial nerves – all with important roles in vision, hearing, and controlling the function of facial muscles. The trigeminal nerve provides feeling to most of the face and mouth, […]

Full-mouth Restoration with Dental Implants

By: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons – AAOMS While a single dental implant may replace a broken or lost tooth, it also can serve as an anchor for multiple replacement teeth. Full-mouth dental implants are what they sound like: a long-lasting replacement for most or all of a patient’s teeth. Full Dental Implants […]

Edentulism

By: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Edentulism is the condition defined by the loss of at least one functional tooth. It can be classified as partial edentulism (one or more lost teeth) to complete edentulism (when a patient has lost all teeth). Whether due to decay, periodontal disease, or trauma, edentulism has a […]

Corrective Jaw Surgery

By: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Corrective jaw surgery – also called orthognathic surgery – is performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) to correct a wide range of minor and major skeletal and dental irregularities, including the misalignment of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve breathing, chewing, and speaking. While the […]

Is Removal of All 4 Wisdom Teeth Necessary?

By: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Patients often ask their oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) if it’s necessary to have all four wisdom teeth extracted even though the teeth might not yet be visible inside the mouth or they have erupted without any known problems. The decision can be difficult. Even if all […]

What is Diastema?

By: Jayne Leonard, Medical News Today A diastema is a gap between the teeth. It is not harmful, and it appears in children and adults. In children, the gap typically closes when their permanent teeth come through. A diastema is a gap between teeth that is wider than 0.5 millimeters. It can develop between any […]

The Story on Soda: Your Soft Drink Questions Answered

🥤 Sorry to burst your bubble, but the reality is that no matter how refreshing that sweet, fizzy soda (or “pop”) tastes, there’s a chance it could be doing some damage to your teeth. But with so many products on the market, are they all really that bad for you? The Oral Surgery DC Team […]