Does teething cause a baby to vomit?

 

By:

 

Vomiting and fever may sometimes accompany teething. Teething is a normal part of a child’s development that may cause some discomfort. However, it is unlikely that teething is a direct cause of vomiting. The Medical News Today shares other possible causes of vomiting and discusses how to relieve the symptoms of teething. The Oral Surgery DC team

Teething is a natural process that every infant goes through. It can be an uncomfortable experience, and it can be concerning for parents and caregivers to see the infant experiencing pain and discomfort.

The symptoms of teething vary from one infant to another. Some babies do not have any symptoms at all when their teeth come in. Others may become mildly irritable, begin to drool, lose their appetite, or cry more than usual. In some cases, vomiting and fever can accompany teething.

Many people believe that vomiting while teething is normal. However, most experts now agree that teething does not cause generalized symptoms, such as vomiting, fever, rash, and diarrhea.

The caregivers of infants who experience vomiting when teething should visit a doctor or pediatrician to determine the underlying cause of this symptom.

What is teething?

Teething occurs when an infant’s teeth first begin to break through the gums. This typically takes place between the ages of 6 and 12 months.

The two front teeth on the lower jaw usually appear first, with the other front teeth following. Molars are next to break through in most cases, with the canines arriving last.

By the age of 3 years, children usually have their full set of 20 baby teeth.

As it takes place over such a broad timespan, parents and caregivers often attribute many symptoms to teething. However, it is more likely that another condition, such as an infection, is causing these additional symptoms.

It can be helpful to understand which symptoms are normal and which are not when it comes to teething.

Typical symptoms of teething include:

  • chewing on objects
  • crying more than usual
  • mild difficulty sleeping
  • drooling more than usual
  • fussiness
  • loss of appetite
  • red, sore, tender, or swollen gums
  • a slight rise in body temperature (not over 101°F)

Research suggests that the symptoms of teething peak as the front teeth appear, which tends to occur between 6 and 16 months of age. As children get older, they are likely to experience fewer and milder symptoms when new teeth come through.

Teething does not typically cause the following symptoms:

  • congestion
  • a cough
  • diarrhea
  • high fever
  • increased number of stools
  • rash
  • refusal of liquids
  • vomiting

 

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322987.php

What Anglo Saxon teeth can tell us about modern health

 

By: University of Bradford, Science Daily

 

Evidence from the teeth of Anglo Saxon children could help identify modern children most at risk from conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Learn more about these critical findings via ScienceDaily. The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

Researchers from the University of Bradford found that analysis of milk teeth of children’s skeletons from a 10th Century site in Northamptonshire, England, gave a more reliable indicator of the effects of diet and health than bone.

The study, published today, 6 September 2018, in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, shows that by analysing dentine from the milk teeth of the Anglo Saxon children, a picture emerges of the development of these children from the third trimester of pregnancy onwards, and is a proxy indicator of the health of the mothers. This is the first time that secure in utero data has been measured.

The skeletons analysed at the University of Bradford come from a settlement at Raunds Furnells and are from a group known to have been under nourished. The effect of this under nourishment, or stress, is to limit the growth of bones. This can limit the evidence available from analysis of bones alone, such as age.

Researchers were also able to look at children of different ages to see whether those who survived the first 1,000 days from conception, during which factors such as height are set, had different biomarkers for stress than those who died during this high-risk period.

Teeth, unlike bone, continue to grow under such stress and, unlike bone, record high nitrogen values. This evidence gives a clearer picture of what is happening to the child from before birth. The teeth are, in effect, acting as an archive of diet and health of both the child and mother.

Dr Julia Beaumont, of the University of Bradford’s School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences, said: “This is the first time that we have been able to measure with confidence the in utero nitrogen values of dentine. We find that when bone and teeth form at the same time, bone doesn’t record high nitrogen values that occur during stress. Our hypothesis is that bone isn’t growing but teeth are. So archaeology can’t rely on the evidence from bones alone because bone is not forming and recording during high stress and we can’t be sure, for example, of the age of a skeleton. Teeth are more reliable as they continue to grow even when a child is starving.”

As well as the archaeological significance of this method of analysis, Dr Beaumont believes it has a direct application to modern medicine.

She said: “There is a growing consensus that factors such as low birthweight have a significant impact on our likelihood of developing conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and obesity and that the first 1,000 days from conception onwards set our ‘template’. By analysing the milk teeth of modern children in the same way as the Anglo Saxon skeletons, we can measure the same values and see the risk factors they are likely to face in later life, enabling measures to be taken to mitigate such risks.”

 

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180906123403.htm

Why is the roof of my mouth swollen?

 

By: Jenna Fletcher, Medical News Today

 

Many conditions may cause a swollen roof of the mouth, including sores, dehydration, and mucus buildups. In this article via Medical News Today, learn about six causes of a swollen roof of the mouth, and possible treatment or home remedies. The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

The roof of the mouth consists of a bony plate at the front and a non-bone, soft section at the back. Together, these serve as a barrier between the oral and nasal cavities. From time to time, the roof of the mouth may become swollen.

Swelling on the roof of the mouth may be due to several potential causes, most of which will resolve with minimal treatment. In less common cases, the swelling may be due to a more serious condition.

Other symptoms may accompany the swelling, including:

  • blisters or other sores
  • dry mouth
  • muscle spasms
  • pain or discomfort

Read on to learn about the possible causes of swelling on the roof of the mouth.

Causes

A range of conditions can cause a swollen roof of the mouth, including:

1. Sores in the mouth

Most common mouth sores, such as canker sores and cold sores, will appear on the gums, cheeks, or lips. In some cases, they may appear on the roof of the mouth.

Sores can cause pain, blisters, and swelling. Some people may notice pain or swelling before the sore appears.

2. Injury or trauma

One of the most common causes of swelling on the roof of the mouth is an injury or trauma. Some of the most common causes of trauma include:

  • eating a hard food that may impact the roof of the mouth
  • eating or drinking an extremely hot item
  • a scratch from a sharp piece of food

3. Dehydration

Dehydration can cause swelling on the roof of the mouth. Dehydration can cause a dry mouth, which can result in swelling if a person does not take steps to relieve the condition.

Some common causes of dehydration and dry mouth include:

  • excessive alcohol intake
  • certain medications
  • not drinking enough water
  • excessive sweating, particularly on hot days or while exercising
  • illness

A person with dehydration that causes an electrolyte imbalance may also feel especially weak or experience muscle spasms.

 

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323028.php

What causes a bump on the roof of the mouth?

 

By: Elaine K. Luo, MD, Medical News Today

 

A bump on the roof of the mouth can be worrisome, especially if it does not go away quickly. Most causes of a bump on this part of the body are easily treatable, but it may also indicate a more serious underlying condition.

Can it be the reason to see our dentist now? More insights via Medical News Today! The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

In this article, learn what can cause a bump on the roof of the mouth, including possible additional symptoms and when to see a doctor.

1. Canker sores

Canker sores can appear on the roof of the mouth.

Canker sores are round, open sores in the mouth. They may be white, yellow, or pale pink and are very sensitive.

Canker sores are most common in the cheeks and gums, but they can also appear in unusual places, such as the roof of the mouth.

There are various causes of canker sores, including biting the cheek while chewing and scratching the roof of the mouth.

These sores usually resolve within a couple of weeks. They are not contagious, but they can be painful or uncomfortable and may make eating difficult.

Some over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription oral creams may numb the pain.

2. Burns

Hot beverages, such as coffee or tea, or foods that have just finished cooking can burn the inside of the mouth, including the roof. If the burn is severe enough, a bump or blister can form.

Minor burns usually heal without treatment, as long as the person takes care to avoid irritating the sensitive skin.

3. Trauma or injury

The inside of the mouth is a sensitive area. Injury to the tissue on the roof of the mouth can lead to a bump forming.

This type of bump may result from:

  • puncture wounds
  • cuts
  • damage to the mouth from tobacco use
  • accidents from dental work
  • irritation from dentures

An injury may cause scar tissue to form in the mouth, which might be lumpy and raised. The sore may be painful or sensitive but will usually heal on its own.

Regularly rinsing the mouth with warm salt water may help promote healing.

4. Cold sores

Cold sores occur when a person has a herpes simplex virus outbreak. The virus produces blisters on the lips and in the mouth. They may also form on the roof of the mouth.

The signs and symptoms of cold sores may include:

  • a tingling sensation before the blisters appear
  • blisters that form in patches or clusters
  • oozing or open blisters that do not rupture
  • blisters that do rupture and crust over before healing

Unlike canker sores, cold sores are very contagious. The outbreak usually clears up without treatment, but it is important to avoid coming into close contact with anyone during that time to prevent spreading the virus.

A doctor may prescribe some medications to speed up the healing process if necessary.

5. Mucoceles

Mucoceles are oral mucous cysts that form due to an irritated or inflamed salivary gland. Mucus builds up in the gland, leading to a round, fluid-filled bump or growth.

Mucoceles are not usually a cause for concern and will heal without treatment, although this may take several weeks.

6. Torus palatinus

A very hard lump on the roof of the mouth may be a sign of torus palatinus. Torus palatinus is an extra bone growth that is benign and not indicative of an underlying condition.

The growth can appear at any age, and it may continue to grow throughout a person’s life. It will not usually require treatment unless it affects a person’s ability to eat, drink, or talk.

7. Candidiasis

Oral candidiasis can cause white bumps in the mouth.

 

Oral candidiasis is a form of yeast infection that may cause red or white bumps in the mouth.

It is vital to see a doctor or dentist for a proper diagnosis of oral candidiasis, as the symptoms may mimic those of other conditions.

A doctor is likely to recommend oral antifungal medication to treat the issue. They will also provide advice on how to prevent the infection in the future.

8. Hand, foot, and mouth disease

Coxsackievirus is the name of the virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). The virus infects the mouth, causing painful blisters and red bumps.

As the name suggests, the symptoms may also appear on the hands and feet. Other symptoms include fever and body aches.

HFMD is more common in young children, but it can affect anyone. Doctors may prescribe medicated mouthwash to help relieve symptoms while they treat the virus.

9. Epstein pearls

Parents who notice lumps in a baby’s mouth may be seeing Epstein pearls. These are cysts that commonly appear in newborns.

Epstein pearls are white or yellow and will go away a few weeks after the birth without causing any additional problems.

10. Hyperdontia

Although rare, a bump in the top of the mouth may be an extra tooth. People with hyperdontia grow too many teeth.

In the upper jaw, these extra teeth usually pop up just behind other teeth, but sometimes they can appear further back toward the roof of the mouth.

A person with hyperdontia may experience pain in the area where the extra tooth is growing as well as jaw pain and headaches.

Hyperdontia is treatable, and dentists can usually remove any extra teeth without complications.

11. Squamous papilloma

The human papillomavirus may also cause bumps to develop in the mouth. These growths are noncancerous, painless, and may have a bumpy, cauliflower-like texture.

Although they can be distracting, squamous papillomas often go away without treatment.

12. Oral cancer

Signs of oral cancer can include a sore that does not heal and an oddly shaped patch of tissue.

In rare cases, sores or bumps on the roof of the mouth may be cancerous. Bumps that occur due to oral cancer may be white, gray, or bright red, depending on the underlying cause. They may feel smooth or velvety.

Possible signs of oral cancer include:

  • a lump or sore that does not heal
  • a rapidly growing lump
  • an oddly shaped patch of tissue
  • open, bleeding sores

However, oral cancer is not the most likely cause of a bump on the roof of the mouth. Many people may confuse signs of oral cancer with other issues in the mouth.

It is crucial to give the sores time to heal. If a bump shows no signs of healing after 2 weeks, it is essential to speak to a doctor for a proper diagnosis.

When to see a doctor

While many bumps on the roof of the mouth will resolve without treatment, some may require medical intervention. A person should see a doctor for:

  • very discolored patches in the mouth
  • pain lasting more than a couple of days
  • a foul smell in the mouth
  • pain when chewing or swallowing
  • severe burns
  • dentures, retainers, or other dental devices that no longer fit properly
  • trouble breathing
  • a fast-growing bump
  • a bump that changes shape
  • a bump that does not go away after 2 weeks
  • a bump that interferes with daily life

Anyone who is concerned about a bump on the roof of their mouth should speak to a doctor, who can help determine the underlying cause and recommend treatment if necessary.

 

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323063.php