Common Types of Oral Surgeries and What You Can Expect

 

By: Dental Pointe

 

💉From wisdom tooth removal to a reconstructive operation, each oral surgery type has different functions. Determine which of them is suitable for your needs. The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

There are several conditions that may warrant getting oral surgery in Naperville. Sure, no one relishes the idea of surgery; however, your Naperville oral surgeon is ready to share some facts that will ensure that you’re prepared for your upcoming procedure. Here are some of the most common types of dental surgeries and what you can expect when you come into our office:

Impacted Wisdom Teeth

These third molars are the last teeth to develop. While sometimes these teeth may erupt and not cause the patient any issues, more often than not these teeth either don’t fully erupt or aren’t properly aligned. This causes them to become impacted between the gums and the jawbone, which will also affect the health of surrounding teeth.

Dental Implants

To replace a missing tooth, we will surgically implant a metal post into the jawbone, which will fuse with the gum tissue and bone over time. This creates a strong foundation on which to place a realistic-looking artificial tooth (or crown). Dental implants are great for those with tooth loss who are looking for a long-term treatment option.

Biopsies

If you have a lesion in your mouth that looks suspect, we will perform a biopsy to check for oral cancer. We will remove a small piece of tissue and then send it to the lab for analysis.

Jaw Surgery

If your jaws aren’t properly aligned, this can cause problems not only with appearance but also with function. Surgery is often necessary to correct this problem and restore function.

Sleep Apnea

If other conservative treatments don’t help serious sleep apnea sufferers, then we can remove excess tissue from the back of the throat to significantly reduce symptoms.

Reconstructive surgery

Knocked-out teeth and facial injuries can make even the most everyday functions a challenge (e.g. eating). These procedures replace missing or damaged teeth, treat jawbone and gum damage, and correct jaw joint issues.

Pre-procedure

Before surgery, we will provide you with an outlined treatment plan. We will also discuss anesthesia options with you and you can feel free to ask any questions you may have about your surgery. Most surgeries are done under general anesthesia to ensure that the patient doesn’t experience any discomfort.

Post-procedure

As with any surgery, there will be a recovery period. If you’re under general anesthesia, you will not be able to drive yourself home afterward. You will want someone to pick you up, as you will be groggy and tired. We may prescribe painkillers for treating recovery-related pain. We will provide you with some detailed do’s and don’ts for after surgery.
Source: http://www.mydentalpointe.com/blog/post/common-types-of-oral-surgeries-and-what-you-can-expect.html

What Are the Most Common Dental Problems?

 

By: Tammy Davenport, Very Well Health

 

😄 Understanding common dental problems allow you to take preventive measures to keep a healthy smile. Remember, your mouth can tell you many things about your body. The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

Dental problems are never any fun, but the good news is that most of them can be easily prevented. Brushing twice a day, flossing daily, eating properly and regular dental check-ups are essential steps in preventing dental problems. Educating yourself about common dental problems and their causes can also go a long way in prevention. Here is a list of common dental problems.

1. Bad Breath

Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be downright embarrassing. According to dental studies, about 85 percent of people with persistent bad breath have a dental condition that is to blame.

Gum disease, cavities, oral cancer, dry mouth, and bacteria on the tongue are some of the dental problems that can cause bad breath. Using mouthwash to cover up bad breath when a dental problem is present will only mask the odor and not cure it. If you have chronic bad breath, visit your dentist to rule out any of these problems.

2. Tooth Decay

Tooth decay, also known as cavities, is the second only to the common cold as the most prevalent disease in the United States. Tooth decay occurs when plaque, the sticky substance that forms on teeth, combines with the sugars and/or starches of the food you eat. This combination produces acids that attack tooth enamel.

You can get cavities at any age—they aren’t just for children. As you age, you can develop cavities as your tooth enamel erodes. Dry mouth due to age or medications can also lead to cavities.

The best way to prevent tooth decay is by brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and going to your regular dental check-ups. Eating healthy foods and avoiding snacks and drinks that are high in sugar are also ways to prevent decay. Your dentist can recommend further treatments that may help reduce your risk.

3. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is an infection of the gums surrounding the teeth. It is also one of the main causes of tooth loss among adults. Some studies have indicated that there may be a link between heart disease and periodontal disease.

Everyone is at risk for gum disease, but it usually occurs after age 30. Smoking is one of the most significant risk factors. Diabetes and dry mouth also increase your risk. The symptoms include bad breath, red, swollen, tender, or bleeding gums, sensitive teeth, and painful chewing.

The two major stages of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Regular dental check-ups along with brushing at least twice a day and flossing daily play an important role in preventing gum disease. You should see your dentist if you have any signs of gum disease so you can get treatment to prevent further complications, such as tooth loss.

4. Oral Cancer

Oral cancer is a serious and deadly disease that affects millions of people. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that someone in the United States dies every hour from oral cancer, but it is often curable if diagnosed and treated in the early stages. It is most often seen in people over the age of 40.

The biggest risk factors are tobacco and alcohol use, including chewing tobacco. HPV—a sexually transmitted wart virus—also increases the risk.

The symptoms of mouth or throat cancer include sores, lumps, or rough areas in the mouth. You may also have a change in your bite and difficulty chewing or moving your tongue or jaw.

Regular dental visits can help catch oral cancer early. You may ask your dentist whether an oral cancer exam is part of their usual checkup. If you notice any of the symptoms or have trouble chewing, swallowing, or moving your tongue or jaw, see your dentist.

5. Mouth Sores

There are several types of mouth sores and they can be pesky and bothersome. Unless a mouth sore lasts more than two weeks, it is usually nothing to worry about and will disappear on its own.

Common mouth sores are canker sores (aphthous ulcers) that occur inside the mouth and not on the lips. They are not contagious and can be triggered by many different causes. They are only a concern if they don’t go away after two weeks.

Fever blisters or cold sores are caused by the Herpes simplex virus and occur on the edge of the outer lips. They are contagious and will come and go but are not completely curable.

Mouth sores are also seen in oral thrush or candidiasis, a yeast infection of the mouth that can be seen in infants, denture wearers, people with diabetes, and during cancer treatment.

6. Tooth Erosion

Tooth erosion is the loss of tooth structure and is caused by acid attacking the enamelTooth erosion signs and symptoms can range from sensitivity to more severe problems such as cracking. Tooth erosion is more common than people might think, but it can also be easily prevented.

7. Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity is a common problem that affects millions of people. Basically, tooth sensitivity involves experiencing pain or discomfort to your teeth from sweets, cold air, hot drinks, cold drinks or ice cream. Some people with sensitive teeth even experience discomfort from brushing and flossing. The good news is that sensitive teeth can be treated.

Sensitive teeth can also be a sign of a cracked tooth or a tooth abscess, which needs to be treated by your dentist to prevent losing a tooth or getting an infection in your jaw bone. If you suddenly develop tooth sensitivity, make an appointment with your dentist to see if there is a source that needs to be treated.

8. Toothaches and Dental Emergencies

While many toothaches and dental emergencies can be easily avoided just by regular visits to the dentist, accidents can and do happen. Having a dental emergency can be very painful and scary. Common problems that require an urgent trip to your dentist include a broken or cracked tooth, an abscessed tooth, or a tooth knocked out in an accident.

Go to a hospital for trauma care if you have a fractured or dislocated jaw or severe cuts to your tongue, lips, or mouth. If you have a tooth abscess that is causing difficulty swallowing or you have developed a fever or facial swelling, get emergency care as well.

9
Unattractive Smile

While an unattractive smile is not technically a “dental problem,” it is a major reason why many patients seek dental treatment.

An unattractive smile can really lower a person’s self-esteem. Luckily, with today’s technologies and developments, anyone can have a beautiful smile. Whether it’s teeth whiteningdental implants, orthodontics or other cosmetic dental work, chances are that your dentist can give you the smile of your dreams.

 

Source: https://www.verywellhealth.com/top-common-dental-problems-1059461

Ibuprofen And Acetaminophen Together May Give Profound Pain Relief With Fewer Side Effects After Dental Surgery

By: Colgate

 

👍🏻 A study conducted by dental experts shows that combining Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen together provides a pain-relief after a wisdom tooth removal. Learn more about their findings! The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

Taking ibuprofen and acetaminophen (APAP) together can help manage pain after dental surgery without significantly increasing the side effects that often are associated with other drug combinations, according to an article in the August issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association.

Taking combinations of drugs to manage pain after oral surgery has been advocated in the last few years as a substitute for taking over-the-counter drugs—such as ibuprofen, naproxen and APAP—by themselves because the drug combinations can provide greater pain relief. The most common combination is APAP and an opioid—a prescription drug. The ibuprofen-APAP combination has been suggested as an alternative to taking opioid-APAP combinations to help patients avoid the potential adverse reactions associated with opioids.

Drs. Paul A. Moore, chair of the Department of Dental Anesthesiology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, and Elliot V. Hersh, professor of pharmacology, Department of Oral Surgery and Pharmacology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, evaluated the scientific evidence for using the ibuprofen-APAP combination to manage pain in patients after they had their wisdom teeth (third molars) removed.

They found that the ibuprofen-APAP combination may provide more effective pain relief and have fewer side effects than many of the opioid-containing combinations. They also found evidence indicating that the ibuprofen-APAP combination provided greater pain relief than did ibuprofen or APAP alone. The adverse effects associated with taking the ibuprofen-APAP combination were similar to those of the individual component drugs.

“The demonstrated improvement in postoperative pain relief for the combination of ibuprofen and APAP provides another strategy for pain management, and an alternative to prescription opioid formulations after third-molar extraction surgery,” stated Drs. Moore and Hersh in their article.

© 2018 American Dental Association. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission from the American Dental Association.

 

Source: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/procedures/tooth-removal/ada-08-ibuprofen-and-acetaminophen-together-may-give-profound-pain-relief-with-fewer-side-effects-after-dental-surgery

Soda After Wisdom Teeth Removal

By: Brynne Chandler, Livestrong

 

😷 Diarrhea may occur after the wisdom tooth extraction, however, this is preventable. Check out these foods recommended to manage this condition. The Oral Surgery DC Team

 

Wisdom teeth, which are also called third molars, generally grow in at the very back of your mouth when you are between the ages of 15 and 25. According to the researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center, most peoples’ mouths are too small to fit four extra teeth. This can cause crowding, pain, infection, and swelling, leading most dentists to extract wisdom teeth. Wisdom tooth extraction is minor surgery, and requires careful aftercare for proper healing. Drinking carbonated soda just after having your wisdom teeth pulled can lead to problems.

Soda

The first carbonated sodas were made from naturally carbonated water. In 1772, British scientist Joseph Priestly dripped sulfuric acid onto chalk. The result was carbon dioxide, which makes the bubbles in your soda. Most sodas also contain large amounts of sugar, which can lead to tooth decay, and sodium, which is very drying to the tissues inside of your mouth.

Extraction

Wisdom tooth extraction is usually performed under a general anesthetic, though many dentists and oral surgeons offer conscious sedation. This means that you can’t feel anything, but are still awake. Wisdom teeth that have already erupted through your gums are pulled out with dental pliers, while extracting them before they erupt may involve cutting open your gum tissue to free the tooth. Either way, the entire tooth is removed, leaving an empty socket.

Aftercare

The University of Oregon Health Center advises that you keep a gentle pressure on the gauze that will be packed into your tooth socket to control bleeding so that the socket can form a clot. Avoid brushing your teeth or rinsing your mouth out for at least 24 hours after the extraction, and avoid very hot or cold drinks–including sodas–and solid foods. The Consumer Guide to Dentistry recommends that you avoid soft drinks, because the bubbles caused by the carbonation can dislodge the blood clot that needs to form in order for the tooth socket to heal.

Misconceptions

Drinking through a straw may seem like a good idea after tooth extraction, but the suction needed to draw the liquid up through the straw can dislodge blood clots. Drinking soda through a straw will also not reduce the amount of bubbles, or keep them away from the extraction sites.

Warning

Dislodging a blood clot before it forms completely causes alveolar osteitis, or dry socket. The absence of the blood clot before the bone and gum tissue has a chance to heal and replace it exposes your bone to the air, and to anything that you put into your mouth. The pain this causes is too severe to be treated with over-the-counter pain relievers and requires medical attention from your doctor or oral surgeon.

Source: https://www.livestrong.com/article/300789-diet-after-the-removal-of-wisdom-teeth/