“What Happens After My Tooth Extraction?”

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→ Here’s everything you need to know from Dr. Nkungula to help prepare for dental care after your visit: 

Post – Operative Mouth Care

Care of the mouth following a surgical procedure is essential in the healing process.

Bleeding: Some bleeding and oozing is normal for several hours after your procedure.

  • Avoid spitting, use of a straw and smoking.
  • Bite down on gauze pack in mouth for 20-30 minutes and then discard or change if necessary.
  • If bleeding is more than slight, bite down firmly on a moistened tea bag for 30 minutes.

Discomfort: If prescription was given, use as directed.

  • Take prescription as soon as you get home and before local anesthesia (numbing) wears off.
  • Do not take pain medication on an empty stomach as it may cause nausea.
  • If no prescription was given, over-the-counter medications (e.g. Aspirin, Advil) can be taken.

Swelling: Some degree of swelling is normal and can be minimized with the use of cold and hot gel pack – the table below is a guide.

COLD
PLACE IN FREEZER FOR 30 MINUTES
HOT
10-15 SECONDS IN MICROWAVE
WHEN USED? Day 1-2 Day 3 onwards
HOW OFTEN? 2-3 times daily 2-3 times daily as needed
WHY? Control and manage swelling Bone and gum healing and repair

Diet: A soft or liquid diet is recommended for the first few days following surgery.

  • Until local anesthesia (numbness) wears off, be careful chewing to prevent biting the numb area.

Care of mouth: Do not rinse your mouth vigorously for the first 24 hours after surgery as vigorous rinsing interferes with clot formation and slows healing

  • After 24 hours,begin gentle warm salt water rinses for one week at extraction site and resume gentle brushing of remaining teeth.
  • Avoid use of alcohol, smoking or carbonated drinks for 1-2 days after surgery.

Note: Antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of birth control medications.  Additional methods of birth control should be used while on antibiotics.

College Student Made His Own Braces For $60, And His Teeth Look Fantastic

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By Kimberly Yam, The Huffington Post

 

🎓 Believe it or not, a college student 3D-printed his own braces for $60! Read below to learn more about this possible game-changer for the dental field. – The Oral Surgery DC Team

This student can confidently grin from ear to ear — and it’s not because of a good orthodontist.

Amos Dudley, a 24-year-old digital design major at New Jersey Institute of Technology, felt self-conscious about his teeth. But being a student, Dudley didn’t have the funds to get braces.

AMOS DUDLEY
Dudley’s teeth before wearing his DIY braces. 

So, he decided to 3-D print his own and documented the DIY project in a recent blog post. His braces totaled less than $60, and after wearing them for about 16 weeks, his teeth are also significantly straighter.

“I feel like I can freely smile again,” Dudley wrote on his blog after creating his own DIY braces. “That’s what’s most important.”

AMOS DUDLEY
Dudley’s teeth, as a result of his own 3-D printed braces. 

Dudley had braces back in high school but explained to BuzzFeed News that he failed to upkeep them. He mentioned on his blog that he avoided smiling for a while because he was unhappy with his teeth.

“They weren’t awful, but they were crooked enough to make me self-conscious,” he explained on the blog. 

AMOS DUDLEY
Dudley’s own braces. 

However, clear-aligners, or clear braces like Invisalign can get pricey, costing up to $8,000. But after studying some images of these expensive clear braces, something dawned on him — they looked like they had the layer striations that come from a 3-D printer.

So he decided to hit up his school’s 3-D printing equipment and scanned and printed models of his teeth, CNN Money reported. He then molded non-toxic plastic molds around them to make 12 sets of braces. He used animation to help figure out the adjustments in each set of braces — a process that many orthodontists use.

AMOS DUDLEY
Dudley, the student himself. 

“I planned the path my teeth would take as a 3-D animation, so that they wouldn’t collide with each other along the path,” he told The Huffington Post in an email. “I used each frame of the animation as an aligner step. I determined the number of steps (frames) I needed by looking up the maximum distance a tooth can be safely moved within a given period of time.”

The student told CNN Money earlier this week that he’s still wearing the last set.

Dudley, who does not recommend attempting any of this at home, told HuffPost that he didn’t consult an orthodontist for his project. But the student did get information from journal articles and textbooks. And though this was a financially friendly alternative to buying braces, he told BuzzFeed that he didn’t undertake the project just to save money — he was also up for the challenge.

“When I realized that I could do something that was a little bit culturally disruptive, while demonstrating my skills as a designer and a maker, and fixing something that was making me self-conscious for virtually free, I felt it was more than worth the risk,” he said.

Article From: http://buff.ly/2dor3ls